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Sky Ferreira's album Night Time, My Time turns two years old

Last Thursday, October 29, Sky Ferreira's debut album, Night Time, My Time, turned two years old. I've been hella busy lately, but I just couldn't miss out on the opportunity to celebrate this masterful record.

If you're not some uptight prude who is offended by nipples, you can view the original uncensored cover here

As I've probably said a gazillion times before, this is an album that truly resonates with me. I just love the aesthetics and how the songs discuss universal themes—excitement, angst, frustration, heartbreak, hedonism, empowerment—in such a unique, raw, complex manner. Named after a line said by murdered homecoming queen Laura Palmer in the 1992 movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, Night Time, My Time eschews Ferreira's shimmering synthpop roots in favor of distorted, murky rock textures that draw heavily from grunge and new wave, with occasional nods to noise pop, shoegaze, and punk.

Since I didn't get to write a proper review back when it first came out, I'll be highlighting some of my favorite cuts from this future classic in honor of its birthday, while we wait for follow-up Masochism.


"Boys"

What a fucking awesome way to kick off the album. Having been constantly let down by boys in the past, Ferreira expresses her restored optimism about love after finding that special guy that makes her feel butterflies in her stomach, amidst a relentless wall of fuzzy, shredding guitars. "I knew it was you all along / You put my faith back in boys." Sounds a lot like something Sleigh Bells would put out, if you ask me.




"24 Hours"

Probably my absolute favorite on the album, if I have to pick one. The power ballad finds Ferreira desperately trying to hang on to the final moments with her lover before he departs once the night turns to day. "I wish these 24 hours would never end / Oh, in these 24 hours / Wish the clock had no hand," she cries over dreamy new-wave synths that harken back to an '80s John Hughes movie. This gem of a song perfectly captures that bittersweet feeling you have when you're having the time of your life and you never want it to end.




"I Blame Myself"

Bubbly synth melodies are contrasted with some of the album's most biting, candid, and cathartic set of lyrics, which seemingly address such topics as Ferreira's misconstrued reputation as a drug-addled party girl, the criticism she received following her September 2013 arrest for drug possession with boyfriend Zachary Cole Smith (of DIIV), and the struggles she faced with her record label. "How could you know what it feels like to fight the hounds of hell? / You think you know me so well," she spits. Despite lashing out at media scrutiny, Ferreira ultimately takes the blame for her public image. As defiant as she sounds, you can also sense some sadness in her voice.




"Omanko"

The album's most experimental piece is also the most surreal and downright weird, and it sounds very much like the result of an acid trip. Taking its title from the Japanese slang term for vagina, the song recalls the work of New York synth-punk duo Suicide, right down to its heavily distorted electronic throbs and scuzzy guitar licks, while Ferreira mutters about "gearing up for a Japanese Christmas." Had it come out a decade earlier, I think "Omanko" would have been a great fit for Sofia Coppola's 2003 masterpiece Lost in Translation.



"You're Not the One"

The album's anthemic lead single perfectly conveys the anxiety and frustration of one-sided feelings, as Ferreira reflects on the fact that the object of her affection is not the one for her and instead got his eyes on someone else. The chorus juxtaposes Ferreira's angsty, dismissive vocals with gritty guitar riffs, in contrast to the hazy soundscapes that dominate the verses, which paint pictures of city lights at night. "I was enjoying the ride / But now we're standing on the gravesite / Left unsatisfied," a pensive Ferreira ponders. Despite the lyrics, this song always makes me feel powerful and badass.



"Love in Stereo"

An ode to unrequited love with a cool '80s atmosphere to it, bouncing along on twinkling synths, slinky guitars, and video game samples. Even though Ferreira has somehow convinced herself that her crush just wants to be friends with her, she can't help her feelings for him, and she wonders if there might be a possibility that he could feel the same way about her. "When he picked me up / What was is his intent / Just to let me down again?" Ferreira coos. Ugh, this hits a bit too close to home.




Also worth checking out: the rebellious anthem "Nobody Asked Me (If I Was Okay)," the effortlessly cool "Heavy Metal Heart," and the menacing, Blondie-esque romp "I Will."

Comments

  1. Irina! This review slaaaaaaaaayed. Nice work :D I'll check out the album again. I have always liked Sky.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks gurl!! ♥ You should totally check it out! It's a masterpiece. Let me know your favorite songs. xx

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